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Online Non-Additive Path Learning under Full and Partial Information

Conference paper
Corinna Cortes, Vitaly Kuznetsov, Mehryar Mohri, Holakou Rahmanian, Manfred Warmuth
ALT '19, Proceedings of the 30th International Conference on Algorithmic Learning Theory, PMLR 98:274-299, 2019.
Publication year: 2019

Abstract. We study the problem of online path learning with non-additive gains, which is a central problem appearing in several applications, including ensemble structured prediction. We present new online algorithms for path learning with non-additive count-based gains for the three settings of full information, semi-bandit and full bandit with very favorable regret guarantees. A key component of our algorithms is the definition and computation of an intermediate context-dependent automaton that enables us to use existing algorithms designed for additive gains. We further apply our methods to the important application of ensemble structured prediction. Finally, beyond count-based gains, we give an efficient implementation of the EXP3 algorithm for the full bandit setting with an arbitrary (non-additive) gain.

Online Learning of Combinatorial Objects via Extended Formulation

Conference paper
Holakou Rahmanian, David P. Helmbold and S.V.N. Vishwanathan
ALT '18, Proceedings of Algorithmic Learning Theory, PMLR 83:702-724, 2018.
Publication year: 2018

Abstract. The standard techniques for online learning of combinatorial objects perform multiplicative updates followed by projections into the convex hull of all the objects. However, this methodology can be expensive if the convex hull contains many facets. For example, the convex hull of n-symbol Huffman trees is known to have exponentially many facets. We get around this difficulty by exploiting extended formulations, which encode the polytope of combinatorial objects in a higher dimensional “extended” space with only polynomially many facets. We develop a general framework for converting extended formulations into efficient online algorithms with good relative loss bounds. We present applications of our framework to online learning of Huffman trees and permutations. The regret bounds of the resulting algorithms are within a factor of O(√log(n)) of the state-of-the-art specialized algorithms for permutations, and depending on the loss regimes, improve on or match the state-of-the-art for Huffman trees. Our method is general and can be applied to other combinatorial objects.

Online Learning of Combinatorial Objects

Thesis
Holakou Rahmanian
PhD Thesis. UC Santa Cruz.
Publication year: 2018

Abstract. This thesis develops algorithms for learning combinatorial objects. A combinatorial object is a structured concept composed of components. Examples are permutations, Huffman trees, binary search trees and paths in a directed graph. Learning combinatorial objects is a challenging problem: First, the number of combinatorial objects is typically exponential in terms of number of components. Second, the convex hull of these objects is a polytope whose characterization in the original space may have exponentially many facets or a description of the polytope in terms of facets/inequalities may not be even known. Finally, the loss of each object could be a complicated function of its component and may not be simply additive as a function of the components. In this thesis, we explore a wide variety of combinatorial objects and address the challenges above. For each combinatorial object, we go beyond the original space of the problem and introduce auxiliary spaces and representations. The representation of the objects in these auxiliary spaces admits additive losses and polytopes with polynomially many facets. This allows us to extend well-known algorithms like Expanded Hedge and Component Hedge to these combinatorial objects for the first time.

Deep Embedding Forest: Forest-based Serving with Deep Embedding Features

Patent
Ying Shan, Jianchang Mao, Dong Yu, Holakou Rahmanian, Yi Zhang
US Patent
Publication year: 2018

Abstract. A deep embedding forest-based (DEF) model for improving on-line serving time for classification learning methods and other tasks such as, for example, predicting user selection of search results provided in response to a query or for image, speech or text recognition. Initially, a deep neural network (DNN) model is trained to determine parameters of an embedding layer, a stacking layer, deep layers and a scoring layer thereby reducing high dimensional features. After training the DNN model, the parameters of the deep layers and the scoring layer of the DNN model and discarded and the parameters of the embedding layer and the stacking layer are extracted. The extracted parameters from the DNN model then initialize parameters of an embedding layer and a stacking layer of the DEF model such that only a forest layer of the DEF model is then required to be trained. Output from the DEF model is stored in computer memory.

Online Learning of Permutations Using Extended Formulation

Workshop paper
Holakou Rahmanian, David P. Helmbold, and S.V.N. Vishwanathan
Discrete Structures in Machine Learning Workshop at NeurIPS 2017,
Publication year: 2017

Abstract. We introduce a new method for efficiently learning permutations that exploits the technique of extended formulation from the combinatorial optimization community. This extended formulation technique encodes the hard-to-describe polytope of permutations as the projection of an easier to describe polytope in a higher dimensional space. Although the best special-purpose algorithm for permutations has a slightly better regret bound, our methodology yields regret bounds like those of other published algorithms. The new methodology can be generalized to other combinatorial objects. It also has an elegant method of determining the algorithm’s initial weight vector and the use of the extended formulation leads to a faster and more natural way to make appropriate predictions.

Online Dynamic Programming

Conference paper
Holakou Rahmanian, Manfred Warmuth
NeurIPS 2017, Advances in Neural Information Processing Systems, Volume 30,
Publication year: 2017

Abstract. We consider the problem of repeatedly solving a variant of the same dynamic programming problem in successive trials. An instance of the type of problems we consider is to find a good binary search tree in a changing environment. At the beginning of each trial, the learner probabilistically chooses a tree with the n keys at the internal nodes and the n + 1 gaps between keys at the leaves. The learner is then told the frequencies of the keys and gaps and is charged by the average search cost for the chosen tree. The problem is online because the frequencies can change between trials. The goal is to develop algorithms with the property that their total average search cost (loss) in all trials is close to the total loss of the best tree chosen in hindsight for all trials. The challenge, of course, is that the algorithm has to deal with exponential number of trees. We develop a general methodology for tackling such problems for a wide class of dynamic programming algorithms. Our framework allows us to extend online learning algorithms like Hedge and Component Hedge to a significantly wider class of combinatorial objects than was possible before.

Deep Embedding Forest: Forest-based Serving with Deep Embedding Features

Conference paper
Jie Zhu, Ying Shan, JC Mao, Dong Yu, Holakou Rahmanian, Yi Zhang
KDD '17: Proceedings of the 23rd ACM SIGKDD International Conference on Knowledge Discovery and Data Mining, August 2017, Pages 1703–1711
Publication year: 2017

Abstract. Deep Neural Networks (DNN) have demonstrated superior ability to extract high level embedding vectors from low level features. Despite the success, the serving time is still the bottleneck due to expensive run-time computation of multiple layers of dense matrices. GPGPU, FPGA, or ASIC-based serving systems require additional hardware that are not in the mainstream design of most commercial applications. In contrast, tree or forest-based models are widely adopted because of low serving cost, but heavily depend on carefully engineered features. This work proposes a Deep Embedding Forest model that benefits from the best of both worlds. The model consists of a number of embedding layers and a forest/tree layer. The former maps high dimensional (hundreds of thousands to millions) and heterogeneous low-level features to the lower dimensional (thousands) vectors, and the latter ensures fast serving. Built on top of a representative DNN model called Deep Crossing, and two forest/tree-based models including XGBoost and LightGBM, a two-step Deep Embedding Forest algorithm is demonstrated to achieve on-par or slightly better performance as compared with the DNN counterpart, with only a fraction of serving time on conventional hardware. After comparing with a joint optimization algorithm called partial fuzzification, also proposed in this paper, it is concluded that the two-step Deep Embedding Forest has achieved near optimal performance. Experiments based on large scale data sets (up to 1 billion samples) from a major sponsored search engine proves the efficacy of the proposed model.

Breathing Rate Prediction Using Finger-tip Sensor

Thesis
Holakou Rahmanian
Masters Thesis. UC Santa Cruz.
Publication year: 2015

Abstract. Personalized health-care is trending and individuals tend to wear sensors in order to record their own health data. As a part of this trend, any redundancy in the data captured by wearable sensors must be exploited to reduce the number of devices one may wear. In this thesis, we work with a device which senses breathing and pulse through pressure tube and pulse oximetry, respectively. Extracting the dependency between these two measurements, we approximately predict the breathing rate by first reconstructing the breathing signal using the data coming from the finger-tip sensor, and then detecting the peaks in the reconstructed signal. For breathing signal reconstruction, two different techniques are used: (1) applying low- and high-pass filters on the pulse signal (2) training a neural network on a prepared dataset. Our experiments show that neural networks have a better performance comparing to filters in reconstructing the breathing signal, and consequently, predicting the breathing rate.